BUSINESS

Korean Air, Raytheon partner for ISTAR military solution

By Kim Da-sol
  • Published : Oct 16, 2019 - 15:24
  • Updated : Oct 16, 2019 - 15:24

South Korean full-service carrier Korean Air said Wednesday that it had partnered with US weapons and military electronics firm Raytheon to cooperate on the Korean military’s Intelligence Surveillance Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance (ISTAR) solution. 

ISTAR is used for missions such as disaster monitoring, border security and protection against ballistic missiles, as well as to track mobile ground targets. The British Royal Air Force is one of Raytheon’s clients, using it on ISTAR-type Sentinel aircraft.

The two firms signed an exclusive collaboration agreement at the Seoul International Aerospace and Defense Exhibition at Seoul Air Base in Seongnam on Tuesday, Korean Air said.

Korean Air Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Lee Soo-keun (right) and Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems President Roy Azevedo pose for a photo after signing an exclusive collaboration agreement during the Seoul International Aerospace and Defense Exhibition at Seoul Air Base in Seongnam, Gyeonggi Province, Tuesday.(Korean Air)

“We expect to make a great contribution to increase surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities for the Korean military by collaborating with Raytheon, which has the world’s best mission equipment technology,” said Korean Air Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Lee Soo-keun.

Under the deal, Korean Air and Raytheon will cooperate in the design, modification and flight tests of ISTAR solutions to meet the Republic of Korea Air Force’s specific mission needs.

Specifically, Raytheon will provide technologies and multiple-intelligence -- or multi-INT -- for the aircraft to improve intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. Korean Air will be responsible for delivering services such as design, logistics and lifecycle support.

Raytheon’s multi-INT platform uses artificial intelligence, radar, multifunction electro-optical, infrared and advanced processing capabilities to provide aircrews with an integrated view of the battlespace.

“Technology is changing the way we fight and the speed at which we do it. For today’s commanders, a few seconds can make the difference between success and failure. By combining multiple sensors with advanced communications systems, we give Korean commanders the information they need, when they need it,” said Roy Azevedo, president of Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems. 

By Kim Da-sol (ddd@heraldcorp.com)


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